Friday, June 21, 2024

If Not Then, Maybe Now

Back when I was putting together the last album, If Not Now When, I had a few bits that I'd recorded a while ago floating about. Mainly just 'I'm bored, so lets plug everything in and have a jam' sort of things, but I had a good few of them kicking about.

Two of them made it onto the album (Acid House Matinee and Teufelstanz), but there were a few left over that I thought sounded pretty good, but maybe didn't work in terms of the album, and wanted them to get their flowers, rather than sit stagnating on a hard drive.

So, with that in mind, I thought 'fuck it' and bobbed them out on Bandcamp as a self-contained little pay-what-you-want companion EP to the album. All three were recorded in one take each (give or take the odd overdub, or cuting out a bum note or two) and have that sort of loose, summery feel that's perfect for this time of year. 

Anyway, enjoy!

Thursday, June 6, 2024

Patreon

Truth be told, when I first launched a patreon, I really didn't know what I was doing. I went full-on, overdrive and threw everything at it: you wanted production advice? I could do that! You wanted sample packs and live shows? I'll do it! Here, have long forgotten tracks from the archive, have a discount code, some merch, behind the scenes videos... the list was endless, and it took a bit of time to understand that the people that very kindly signed up to it wanted... absolutely none of that whatsoever. They wanted to show support and to maybe get first dibs on albums, and that was about it. 

I came close to just cancelling the whole thing, as I'd just started a new job and didn't really have a lot of time to dedicate to it, so felt bad that I was ripping people off by charging them every month, but once again, people just told me that they just wanted to support the band, and didn't really expect anything more. I should probably just listen more! I am an idiot. 

Anyway, so I came up with a compromise, and that was to dig into the bones of what made the Patreon so good in the first place, discard the rest and keep it super simple, which is where we are now, with this satan Patreon 2.0.

I've ditched the tiering system, so it's a flat £5 a month, and you can come and go as you please - don't think of it as a lifetime membership or anything, it's fine to just swing by for a month or two. I've kept the core things that people enjoyed, and the ones I enjoyed doing, and binned the rest. So, for your money each month, you now get:

Access and downloads to records 2 weeks before they land elsewhere, sneak peeks at up-coming records, video and audio of new live sets that me and Sophie play in the studio, discount codes on merch and physical items, Q&As, and my personal favourite: the mix series (which are sort of a hybrid between 'mix' mixes and radio shows these days)

Genuinely feels good to be able to offer all that, and I hope some of you come on over. You can sign up here, and if you've any questions, just ping me and I'll do my best to answer.


Friday, May 17, 2024

If Not Now, When

It's new (double) album time!

Also it's pay-what-you-want as it's my birthday today, so fill yr boots:

Tuesday, May 14, 2024

The big squeeze

Seeing two DIY bands who are friends of mine, in completely different music scenes, both express a resigned exhaustion at the state of live music last night was a real depressing eye opener.

Both DIY, both on the hunt for gigs, both desperate to play live and meet people and do all the good stuff that comes with playing live, and both utterly fed up. Can't say I blame them either, as I'm in exactly the same boat.

Bookings ain't what they used to be, and usually if I'd get fed up at the state of things, I'd just book a load of rooms myself and just promote a tour that way, but I've been completely unable to do that this year either. Venues closing down, or ramping up prices (gigging in Glasgow went from £50 to £150 for room hire alone) means you either lose a ton of money, or you just don't bother. 


And why would you bother? Audiences are fairly thin on the ground at the moment, and only getting spread thinner due to more and more mid level bands hoovering up the only venues and promoters left, and realistically who are those venue owners going to trust to fill their places more? A balding 40 year old with dreams of getting 20 people in a room to listen to his unsigned ambient electronica, or a hot new band on a label with a booking agent whispering in their ear about how much of a push they're getting from various press outlets, etc?

It works for them, but just means myself (and the countless other bands in the same boat) have fuck all places to actually go and play. There's no sweatbox anymore, little places you can cram a few sweaty people into and have a good time for very little money, where you can try out a few new bits in a pressure free environment. It absolutely sucks.

So outside of booking a tour where I (once again) would have to book rooms, promote, do sound, the door, etc. all myself, there aren't not a lot of options. And I'm the lucky one here too, as I've amassed a fairly respectable audience for my stuff. It's not massive by any stretch, but those new bands trying to get someone to listen to them are in a really shit position:the mid level touring act brimming with industry and investment rolls into town and hoovers up all the money and audience, the huge acts like your Taylor Swifts just annihilate everything else, and you're left looking at a DIY scene with limited funds, limited spaces and limited opportunities. No wonder so many just jack it in.

Tuesday, April 30, 2024

Poindexter lives!

l-r: Leon (bass), Simon (keys), me (guitar)
 

At the weekend I met up with half of my old band from back in the old, old days of 2003ish, Johnny Poindexter. Yes, it was a stupid name for a band (I have form in this, don't forget), but it was actually supposed to be a very 'serious' post-rock band. Which is funny, because it started as just a way of me and a few pals from where I grew up to just piss about with guitars and stuff like that. 

It grew out of that and into a very po-faced post-rock band in the end though, and by 2005ish, we were gigging around Leeds, and had put out a record. It was fun, but these things never last do they? It eventually led into worriedaboutsatan though, so I do owe it quite a bit.

I'd lost touch with Leon, who played bass in the post-rock days, until Simon (who I very much am still in contact with, as he lives down the road) put together a day out around some breweries around where we live. Was really nice to see Leon again, and always nice to have a natter with Si, reminiscing about the old days and all that stuff old people do over pints.

But yeah, it's nice! Give your old pals a ring and go for a beer. consider this a PSA! Especially if you used to be in a band: just meet up and have a drink, it's great!
 

Monday, April 15, 2024

Halcyon days

It's weird how with age, and a crumbling grassroots music industry, your priorities start to shift. 

Back in the day, I'd have been a real, proper, arsehole about how to push the band and how to get what I'd deem as 'famous' - getting signed, get a manager, a label, booking agent, etc. and now, as I'm approaching my 41st birthday, I look at all that same stuff and just think how absolutely not-for-me it all is.

Don't get me wrong, if Warp rang me tomorrow, you best believe I'd be there with bells on, but unless a miracle happens, that'll stay as satan fanfic for the forseeable. It's so strange, because a lot of what this business is based on, is just bullshit - there's no real reason why anyone gets signed over anyone else, or why someone sees something in one band but not in another - it's totally up to the hands of fate really, but 'the biz' has a real weird way of getting you to think the opposite, like you should suddenly go to war to get a record put out by someone. 

My increasing age, wasitline, and bald patch has meant that I'm not exactly thrilled at the prospect of booking yet another DIY tour round the same 5 venues, but for the first time in while, I'm completely cool with that. It's taking your foot off the gas, but all the voices in your head, and all the ones online, saying how you should keep it on there because 'you never know'. Well, I mean, in 2024: who fucking cares?

Time was I'd be trying to push the band to everything, but looking back now, it's funny how futile all that was. You've no idea how many times, in the years between 2010-2016ish, that I heard of some new fangled way to 'make it big' - game the algorithm! do this! go viral! do that! start a new project! re-brand your facebook! - so much of it was about trying to cut an imaginary corner, trying to be fake famous, gaming some system or other to trick people into liking you. All of the blog-heavy scene of those years was essentially built around that, and looking back, maaaaaan... what a waste of time. It's no coincidence the whole 'anonymous producer' thing was big around then - it was just people trying anything to get signed, by any means neccesary.

I dunno what the point of all this whinging is, but I'd like to believe that these days, I can just pop a record out, a few of you will buy it, and that's fine. Whereas once I'd be mega jealous of a band doing an insanely long tour, or having a fancy record out, now I just realise the extra baggage that comes with all that, and if I can just sit here and spout nonsense and post silly pictures and all that, yet still shift a few records to people that want them, then that's fine with me. I'm in my grandad-sat-on-the-front-porch era, and that's absolutely fine. I suppose it's a paean to just knowing you have it pretty good and learning to live with that.

Once, there was someone that suggested satan change it's name, because of the connotations with the word 'satan' and how hard it is to market something with that name, and a younger me would've wrestled with a way to get around that, but a 40+ me just, and I can't stress this enough, be fucked. If no-one wants it, fine, I'll stop, but some people do and it's those that honestly keep me going.

Friday, March 8, 2024

Hi Prog readers!

If you've seen the ad in Prog Magazine, may I take this opportunity to say hi- Hi there! Welcome. My name's Gavin and I make music under the name worriedaboutsatan (it's a long story lol). 

Anyway, The album I placed that ad for is called JÆJA, sounds quite kosmische-y (think NEU! Can, Tangerine Dream, etc) and you can hear it here:

It's cheap if you wanna buy it, and please consider signing up to my Bandcamp mailing list too if you've a spare 5 minutes. 

Thanks and hopefully see you around,

Gavin